This New Cannabis Patch Can Effectively Treat Fibromyalgia and Diabetic Nerve Pain

In this day and age, most people are aware of the powerful medicinal benefits of Cannabis. Cannabis is being studied in almost every aspect for its benefits against cancer. But this new method of cannabis treatment is some serious medical technology.

A company that specializes in the medicinal powers of marijuana have invented a new method of cannabis treatment. They have created transdermal patches. They are basically adhesives to the skin, and the medication is absorbed by the skin. The patch releases certain chemicals over time to combat neurological nerve pain. There have been no negative side effects found either. This seems to be the best way to administer medicinal cannabis to patients.

cannabis-science

The creator of the patch, Cannabis Science said:

PROMOTE HEALING TO AN INJURED AREA OF THE BODY. AN ADVANTAGE OF A TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY ROUTE OVER OTHER TYPES OF MEDICATION DELIVERY SUCH AS ORAL, TOPICAL, INTRAVENOUS, INTRAMUSCULAR, ETC. IS THAT THE PATCH PROVIDES A CONTROLLED RELEASE OF THE MEDICATION INTO THE PATIENT, USUALLY THROUGH EITHER A POROUS MEMBRANE COVERING A RESERVOIR OF MEDICATION OR THROUGH BODY HEAT MELTING THIN LAYERS OF MEDICATION EMBEDDED IN THE ADHESIVE WHICH WILL BE CONTAINING HIGH POTENCY CANNABINOID (CBD) EXTRACT THAT SLOWLY ENTERS INTO THE BLOODSTREAM AND THEN PENETRATES THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF THE PATIENT DELIVERING THE PAIN RELIEF SOUGHT.”

Company CEO of Cannabis science also said:

“THE DEVELOPMENT OF THESE TWO NEW PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICINAL APPLICATIONS ARE JUST THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG FOR WHAT WE SEE AS THE FUTURE FOR CANNABIS SCIENCE. WHILE WE STRIVE TO INCREASE OUR LAND CAPACITY FOR GROWTH AND FACILITIES TO PRODUCE OUR OWN PRODUCT TO SUPPLY OUR SCIENTISTS WITH PROPRIETARY MATERIALS TO MAKE THESE FORMULATIONS, WE ARE ALSO BUSY RESEARCHING MORE POTENTIAL NEEDS FOR CANNABIS RELATED MEDICAL APPLICATIONS AND DEVELOPING THE METHODS FOR DELIVERY OF THESE MEDICATIONS.”

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The Stories We Tell: Unrest Inspired ME/CFS Effort Triumphs in the Unlikeliest of Places

When things start moving, help shows up in the most unlikely places.  Take a recent blog from a University of Michigan sports blogger – Ace. Ace has been sick since high school but only in the last couple of years has he been diagnosed as having chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).

ace-anbender

Inspired by the film Unrest, Ace told his ME/CFS story to his college sports followers

Ace has been sports blogging from bed for the last five years or so on Univ. of Michigan sports matters – a school that is rabid about its sports. The MGOBlog Ace writes for is committed to cover U of Michigan football – in “exhaustive, extreme, and debilitating detail.” He has 60,000 followers.

On the 9th of December, Ace made a decision to really spill the beans about his health – on his sports blog. He had done this before but not in quite the same way or maybe people were just ready for it this time.

In his “Dispatch From A Frigid Basement On Monday Afternoon, I’m Pretty Sure he didn’t tip-toe his way around his illness – he plunged in full bore. Ace is in a relapse right now. He has no idea how long he will be in it – and he’s not asking for pity. He wants to explain his absences and even more he just wants people to know….

In one of the more dramatic moments in the film Unrest, Jen tears up not over the possibility of dying or even of being sick – she’d come to grips with both –  but of the very likely possibility that she with her once bright future could just fade away, unseen and unheard.

With the toll ME/CFS takes on a person’s functioning it’s so hard NOT to fade away. Ace may never get well but he made the decision that he was going to be heard. He reported:

I may feel this way for several more weeks, perhaps months. I may get worse, lose some of the 25 pounds I worked so hard to put back on, fall into an extended depression. I may start improving tomorrow.

This is my reality. It has been, in some form, the entire time I’ve worked here. While these last two weeks have been particularly rough, these symptoms, and so many more, are ever present. It’s easy to overlook.

There’s more on the difficulty of keeping things clean  (read the maggot story…), his very limited ability to work, the help he needs at age 30 to do the most basic things…Not stuff that any guy would like to fess up to – particularly to a bunch of rabid, college-age sports junkies.

univ-michigan-mgoblog

Could a college sports blogger actually inspire people to support ME/CFS?

Not stuff that you would think a sports blog would even allow to be printed either. Why would they? This has nothing to do with Michigan sports.   But Ace’s managers and co-workers have bent over backward to support him. Add them to his room-mates who help him keep his room clean, his girlfriend and finally his parents – one of whom had ME/CFS. As Ace noted – having an ME/CFS patient in the house is not an easy gig.

“It’s not easy to live with someone with CFS; we don’t go out, we’re often hyper-sensitive, we’re definitely not helpful around the house, and there’s usually frustration and depression and even rage bubbling just below the surface.”

Not exactly sport geek material but they got ME/CFS in spades.  The 200 plus comments have been uniformly positive and supportive.  They got it like most people who come to this disease with an open mind do. They got it like the people at the screening of Unrest in Sedona I was at yesterday got it. They were alarmed that things could get so bad and they showed compassion.  Some of them even learned that they or somebody they know has it.

Another act of rawness and courage – Jen Brea’s filming of Unrest – inspired Ace to write his blog.  His writing, in turn, will inspire others. This is how the true story of ME/CFS gets spread – person by person – by people authentically telling their stories.

Ace’s father Ken had ME/CFS. This is one of his conceptions of it. From Eye-Music – http://eye-music.com/

Ace didn’t stop there. Encouraged by the response which he called “overwhelming and uplifting and freeing” two days later he wrote “Same Chair, New Day, Let’s Fire The Money Cannon” asking his sports buddies (80% younger males?) to financially support ME/CFS research by giving money to The Solve ME/CFS Initiative. Telling your story takes one kind of courage. Asking the readers of a sports blog to give money for a mysterious disease that makes you fatigued takes an entirely different kind of guts.

Yet it worked. His readers blew through his $5K ask in three hours and doubled it three hours later. After he promised he’d get the Wild Thing haircut they’ve added almost 10K more. In just a couple of days, the sports college community at the University of Michigan has contributed over $19K(!) to an organization and a disease they’d probably never heard of a few days before.

That’s the power of a story and it illustrates an important thing about ME/CFS. We have allies out there we’ve never heard of; allies who will show when as we share our stories. It’s not easy to share your story.  My family has been supportive since day 1 yet it was only last month that I shared with them, for the first time in decades, some of what ME/CFS is like. It was good for them to hear it and it was good for me to share it.

We literally have no idea the impact that sharing our story  – however we choose to  do it –  will ultimately have; who’s life it will touch, who’s life it might change, what actions it might prompt.  Our stories come at great cost and they should be proudly and openly shared. People should know….

Ace’s decision to share his story and what came out of it reminded me of this quote from a Scottish mountaineer:

“Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favour all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his way. I have learned a deep respect for one of Goethe’s couplets:

  • Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it.
  • Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it!”

William Hutchison Murray

Ace was inspired by the film Unrest to tell his story. He called it “a remarkable, raw, unfiltered look into the lives of those with CFS and those closest to them“.  Now is a great time to share Unrest – it’s airing on PBS (check your local listings) and is free to stream for the next couple weeks. (If you have access – check out the latest review of Unrest on the Wall Street Journal no less.)

The post The Stories We Tell: Unrest Inspired ME/CFS Effort Triumphs in the Unlikeliest of Places appeared first on Health Rising.

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The Stories We Tell: Unrest Inspired ME/CFS Effort Triumphs in the Unlikeliest of Places


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Differing case definitions point to the need for an accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

ME/CFS is defined by a combination of symptoms, most of which are non-specific and common to a number of diseases and conditions.

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6 painless fibromyalgia symptoms that often go unnoticed

The pain of fibromyalgia can easily derail your whole life. This is an agonizing experience and seemingly ending that leaves you unable to do things that others take for granted. But while this pain is the most notable symptom and one that usually sends people to the doctor for the first time, there are many painless symptoms of fibromyalgia.

And because many of these symptoms are not things that people usually associate with fibromyalgia, they often go unnoticed, which can delay getting a diagnosis. So here are some painless fibromyalgia symptoms you need to watch.

6 painless symptoms of fibromyalgia

Fibro fog

One of the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia painless – and difficult to recognize – is called the “fibrous fog.” Essentially, it’s a kind of mental fog that occasionally affects people with fibromyalgia and resulting in a range of mental disorders symptoms.

Usually the fibro fog makes it difficult to focus on daily tasks and makes you forget the simple details that you just learned. It is not uncommon for someone with fibro fog do something like leaving her house keys in the door or spend half an hour looking their mobile phones to realize that this is in their hand.

You might even forget the names of people you just met, which can be very embarrassing. But these are all things that happen to everyone from time to time, making it difficult to immediately associate this symptom in fibromyalgia. But if you are still having focus problems, it is possible that you are suffering from fibro fog.

Anxiety

Anxiety is another common symptom of fibromyalgia indomitable. Unfortunately, everyone feels anxious from time to time and many people in the world suffer from anxiety disorders. For example, 18% of all Americans struggle daily with severe anxiety, making it the most common mental illness in the country.

But the persistent anxiety is also associated with fibromyalgia. And that means that if you are having panic attacks or feelings of fear regularly, you might have the condition.

 

of frequent bowel movements

The irritable bowel syndrome is a condition that affects about 10% of the world population. And it is characterized by a wide range of problems with your intestines. This can make you constipated or do the opposite and make you bad diarrhea. This is actually a much bigger problem than the name might suggest.

However, fibromyalgia can often result in symptoms similar to IBS. And people with fibromyalgia often end up feeling constipated or have frequent bowel movements.

So if you go often in the bathroom (or not often enough), you may suffer from fibromyalgia.

frequent urination

Another strange symptoms of fibromyalgia painless but is frequent urination. Essentially, someone who suffers from this symptom found to have an uncontrollable need to urinate frequently, no matter how little they drink or how often they go.

And although it does not seem to be a serious problem, imagine having to urinate very badly but can not get up because of your severe fibromyalgia pain. Or imagine having a little sleep, you can interrupt by a need to use the bathroom. This causes frequent urination is a symptom rather unpleasant.

itching

Itching is one of the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia painless and is one of the most irritating. In fact, some people with fibromyalgia démanient that is worse than the pain. Essentially, it is a feeling of bugs lying around on your skin or severe itching that you can not just heal.

No amount of creams or lotions seems to really help and just let your bloody scrape skin without any relief. Of course, few people immediately associate itching to fibromyalgia, which makes it very easy to overlook symptoms.

Tingling or numb hands and feet

In addition to the pain of fibromyalgia, this causes other sensations in your body. One of the most common is a touch in your hands or feet. You probably recognize the feeling as you feel when your members “fall asleep”.

It is a feeling of numbness in the limb followed by a sensation of pins and needles as the feeling comes back. But while everyone has a member fall asleep occasionally after sleeping or sitting on it, the feel of fibromyalgia can occur at any time and is usually overlooked by people suffering from the disease.

Fibromyalgia causes a range of symptoms, and most are easy to miss if you’re not careful. So always make sure to carefully review the symptoms and consult a doctor if you become severe.

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6 painless fibromyalgia symptoms that often go unnoticed


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Fibromyalgia is death disease

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Fibromyalgia

While there is a lot of ongoing speculation about what triggers fibromyalgia, its causes have yet to be definitively identified and confirmed. Recent research has generally found that fibromyalgia is most likely a result of what scientists call central sensitization, or unusual responses in the nervous system with regard to pain perception.

 

 

Fibromyalgia’s Biochemical Triggers

“The [current] consensus is that fibromyalgia is not a problem with the muscles, joints, or tendons, but rather a problem with the central nervous system,” says Dr. Bruce Solitar, clinical associate professor of medicine in the division of rheumatology at NYU Medical Center/Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York. While it’s easy to think that pain felt by someone who has experienced no physical damage to the body might be categorized as purely psychosomatic, the sensations that a fibromyalgia patient experiences are as real as any other pain.

This was clearly demonstrated when researchers did MRI imaging of patients with fibromyalgia. When they pressed on certain areas of the participants’ bodies, they found dramatically increased activity in the pain center of the brain. One theory attributes this phenomenon to an increased release of substance P, the chemical that activates nerves when there is a painful stimulus. “In fibromyalgia patients, substance P is being released even in the absence of a painful stimulus. And there seems to be an amplified release when there is a painful stimulus,” explains Dr. Solitar. In addition, the brain’s regulatory effect, which sends “down signals” to turn off pain, also appears to be abnormal in people with fibromyalgia — so when a painful stimulus does occur, it gets amplified rather than dampened.
Fibromyalgia’s Physical and Emotional Triggers

So what causes the nervous system to malfunction in such a way? Scientists aren’t sure, but a number of conditions have been linked to the development of fibromyalgia. These include:

Infection. The Epstein-Barr virus, and the viruses that cause influenza, and hepatitis B and C have all been implicated in the development of fibromyalgia. “These viruses may have [long-term] effects on the immune system. It’s also possible that viral particles attach to glial cells, which are cells within the brain that affect neurotransmission [and influence the pain response],” says Dr. Solitar. Additionally, there is a well-established connection between Lyme disease (caused by a bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi) and fibromyalgia: Some patients who have been treated for Lyme — and ostensibly recover from it — continue to experience the unusually high frequency of unprovoked pain that characterizes fibromyalgia.

Trauma. Sometimes the development of fibromyalgia is linked to physical injury, especially in the upper (cervical) spine. In other cases, it’s associated with great emotional stress, like the death of a family member or the loss of a job. The possible link between these unrelated types of trauma is the neurohormonal change that both physical injury and emotional stress can trigger. Psychological processes can change — and can be changed by — alterations in the function of hormone-regulating centers like the hypothalamus and the pituitary and adrenal glands, which in turn can affect the nervous system.

Fibromyalgia’s Other Common Threads

“Fibromyalgia has been associated with all age groups, though women between the ages of 30 and 50 have a higher incidence of the disease,” says Dr. Solitar. While this increased prevalence among younger females suggests a hormonal connection, he says it’s also possible that it’s related to diagnosis. “Women tend to [naturally] be more tender [or sensitive to pain] than men, so if you base your diagnosis on tender points, you’re likely to diagnose more women with fibromyalgia than men.”

Also, fibromyalgia often develops in multiple members of the same family, although it’s not clear if this is the result of genetic or environmental effects. “Family members of people with fibromyalgia seem to be more tender than others,” says Dr. Solitar, “but there isn’t a lot of conclusive genetic research out there.”

In many cases, why fibromyalgia strikes is still largely unknown. “For a lot of patients, we don’t come up with a good explanation for the development of fibromyalgia,” Dr. Solitar notes. “We all get exposed to stress regularly. And while trauma and infections do seem to be a common [fibromyalgia] theme, there are a lot of people who just slowly develop a sense of feeling poorly.”

and its varying array of symptoms often baffle patients and physicians alike. There is still no widely accepted diagnostic blood test or biomarker for the disease, even though sufferers report life-altering physical limitations. Now, new research at the University of Michigan is linking the broad range of fibromyalgia symptoms to a brain molecule called glutamate, opening the door to new treatment options and more precise methods of diagnostic testing.

Fibromyalgia: New Evidence May Help With Diagnosis
Symptoms of fibromyalgia run the gamut from extreme fatigue and flulike body aches to digestive ills and migraine headaches. Due to the absence of a specific quantitative or qualitative test, however, physicians have long been forced to rely on a patient’s self-report to help diagnose this elusive condition. For this reason, some doctors didn’t take the malady seriously.

Groundbreaking research done in 2002 by Daniel Clauw, M.D., professor of medicine and associate dean at the University of Michigan Medical School, provided the first solid biological and physical evidence that fibromyalgia patients really felt intense pain when they said they did. A form of brain imaging called a functional MRI (fMRI) showed that those with fibromyalgia were much more sensitive to pain than those in a control group; similar levels of pain also caused different areas of the brain to light up on the scans of the FM group than those of the control group.
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The widespread nature of the chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia — pain not specific to any one group of muscles or joints — is currently under investigation. “Most physicians believed fibromyalgia was a peripheral issue, involving the muscles and joints, because that’s what patients experienced and reported,” says Richard Harris, Ph.D., research investigator in the Department of Internal Medicine’s Rheumatology division at the University of Michigan Medical School, as well as a researcher at the university’s Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center; and a colleague of Dr. Clauw. “Findings from our new research suggest that fibromyalgia may be more of a central nervous system condition. This makes it harder for critics to explain away the findings—patients can’t fake an MRI test result.”

Fibromyalia: Glutamate Linked to Pain
Dr. Harris and other University of Michigan researchers found that pain levels in fibromyalgia patients correlated positively with the levels of glutamate, an amino acid and neurotransmitter (brain chemical) responsible for stimulating nerve cells. “When patients were given treatments designed to reduce their pain, glutamate levels went down in a corresponding way,” Harris explains.

Earlier research showed a link between activity in a part of the brain called the insula (insular cortex) and pain in fibromyalgia sufferers. The insula region is also involved with stimuli from muscles and skin in addition to internal sensations like those from the bowel. This association may help explain the higher incidence of digestive problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome, in fibromyalgia. Other fibromyalgia-associated conditions, such as anxiety and migraine headaches, may also be linked to the central nervous system’s involvement, according to Andrew Holman, M.D., rheumatologist and assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of Washington.

Fibromyalgia: Research Leads to New Medications
New medications are now available for use in treating fibromyalgiasymptoms thanks to this research. “The Food and Drug Administration recently approved pregabalin (Lyrica) and duloxetine (Cymbalta), two medications that both work centrally, as a direct result of the new research,” says Dr. Holman. “Fibromyalgia has its own process, but the problems of the autonomic nervous system that cause Stage 4 sleep deprivation [a symptom of fibromyalgia] originate in the same areas of the brain that are responsible for such issues as bowel motility [which relates to IBS] and the basic fight or flight syndrome [which relates to anxiety symptoms].”

Although these findings validate many of the more subtle symptoms experienced by fibromyalgia patients, more research is needed before fMRI scan testing becomes part of a routine diagnosis, says Harris. Until then, Harris stresses the importance of being aware of your symptoms and managing them appropriately. “Fibromyalgia is not one of those conditions where you can do one thing and then you’re done,” he notes. “It’s a matter of managing symptoms through a multifaceted approach.”

  • MedicaFibromyalgia tions

The precise causes of fibromyalgia remain a matter of speculation, so today’s treatments, even those approved by the FDA, are non-specific at best. Many pharmaceutical options, however, are available for treating fibromyalgia’s diverse symptoms, which can range from muscle pain and sleep problems to depression and anxiety.

To date, the antidepressants duloxetine (Cymbalta) and milnacipran (Savella), and pregabalin (Lyrica), an antiseizure medication that’s also used for certain types of pain, are the only prescription medications approved by the FDA specifically for the treatment of fibromyalgia. But doctors employ many other drugs, approved for related conditions, to treat specific symptoms of fibromyalgia. Many of these medications address more than one fibromyalgia-associated problem. As with all drugs, many of the medications listed here have significant side effects and interactions. You should discuss any medicines you are prescribed with your doctor and your pharmacist before taking them. This will help you know what to expect and when you need to report a problem or look for a substitute drug.

Pain relief and improved sleep are the primary goals of fibromyalgia treatment and medications, but doctors also prescribe various drugs to treat depression and fatigue.
The following medications are commonly used in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

Pain relievers
Most over-the-counter analgesics don’t work very well for fibromyalgia, because the disorder doesn’t involve much inflammation. Prescription opioids and localized injections can sometimes be helpful, depending on the specific symptoms.

  • OTC analgesics. Tylenol (acetaminophen) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox) may help in some patients. However, they are generally recommended for patients experiencing peripheral pain syndrome (involving muscles and connective tissue and/or the peripheral nervous system as opposed to fibromyalgia, which is a disorder of the central nervous system) in addition to fibromyalgia.
  • Opioid therapies. Some relief of pain has been reported with opiates such as tramadol (Ultram), and with the combination of tramadol and acetaminophen (Utracet)— both of which may also relieve sleep problems. While effective for acute severe pain, opioids such as hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin), propoxyphene/acetaminophen (Darvocet), oxycodone/ acetaminophen (Percocet), and oxycodone (OxyContin) don’t work as well on long-tem chronic pain, generally speaking. Additionally, they carry the risk of addiction and have been linked to other side effects — for example, increasing the body’s sensitivity to pain, as well as to drowsiness and constipation.
  • Trigger point injections. Injections of local anesthetics (such as lidocaine and procaine) and/or cortisone (a steroid medication) may help treat painful muscles, tendons, or ligaments and break cycles of pain and muscle spasm.

Antidepressants
These medications help regulate certain chemicals in the brain, called neurotransmitters, that are implicated in various fibromyalgia symptoms, including muscle pain, sleep problems, and fatigue. To achieve the best results, they are sometimes used in combination. Those commonly prescribed include:

  • Tricyclic antidepressants. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and doxepin (Sinequan) as well as the tetracyclic antidepressant trazodone (Desyrel), increase the levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, brain neurotransmitters that affect pain signals and depression, and often have a sedative, sleep-inducing effect.
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Included in this group are citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), fluvoxamine (Luvox), and paroxetine (Paxil).
  • Selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs). This newer class of antidepressants, also known as dual uptake inhibitors, helps regulate the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine. They include venlafaxine (Effexor), desvenlafaxine (Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and Savella (milnacipran).

Muscle relaxants
Medications such as cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril, Cycloflex, and Flexiban), carisoprodol (Soma), and methocarbamol (Skelex) are often prescribed to treat painful muscle spasms; they are usually used for short-term relief.

Anticonvulsants
This class of drugs is used for fibromyalgia because these medications also help treat neuropathic pain, which occurs when nerves are overexcited and need to be desensitized. Drugs in this category include pregabalin (Lyrica), as well as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Epitol, Equetro, Tegretol, and Tegretol-XR) and gabapentin (Gabarone, Neurontin).

Sedatives/Hypnotics
Restful sleep is critical for easing the symptoms of fibromyalgia. If other medications (specifically, muscle relaxants and antidepressants) are not effective, doctors may prescribe short-term sleep aids such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), and eszopiclone (Lunesta), which work by slowing brain activity to permit sleep. Such medications often lose their effectiveness over the long term, however.

Stimulants
Some doctors are now prescribing medications used for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin), dextroamphetamine sulfate (Dexedrine), and modafinil (Provigil) to ease symptoms of fatigue and “brain fog” (difficulty thinking and concentrating) that patients with fibromyalgia often experience.

On the horizon
Among new medications being researched for the treatment of fibromyalgia is sodium oxybate (Xyrem), also known as GHB. This central nervous system depressant is currently approved for the treatment of narcolepsy, but has shown promise for pain relief and improved functioning in patients with fibromyalgia. An application for approval was submitted to the FDA on December 15, 2009.

Finally, in addition to prescription medications, doctors often recommend thatother pain management therapies be explored. Among the most effective are therapeutic massage and myofascial release therapy, a specialized technique used to ease tension in the body, which can help relieve muscle discomfort and reduce spasms.

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Fibromyalgia is death disease


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17 of the Worst Symptoms of Fibromyalgia (and How People Deal With Them)

Fibromyalgia manifests itself in different ways for different patients, but most can agree that all the symptoms are life-altering. It’s not always clear how (or if) they can be treated, and the physical challenges can all too easily turn into emotional challenges as the things you used to do become more and more difficult.

We asked our Mighty community with fibromyalgia which symptoms they consider the worst and how they cope with them. If you’re experiencing these difficult symptoms as well, check out the strategies they use, and don’t forget that you aren’t alone in dealing with the hardships of fibromyalgia.

Here’s what the community told us:

1. “Never-ending fatigue. I’m still trying to figure out what helps, but so far, certain homeopathic medicines are working. My online support group helps tremendously! And there’s always Netflix. Cuddles from my cats help, too!”

2. “When I feel like I’m walking through quicksand. The only thing that helps is to take a break for a day and rest.”

3. “To me, the worst part of fibro isn’t the pain/stiffness or the constant fatigue, it’s my non-existent social life and constantly feeling alone/misunderstood. Even on the awful days, I always find some way to cope or I just lay in bed and whine to my pets. But it’s hard to find a way to ‘cope’ with the loneliness and the depression that follows it.”

4. “The worst is the joint stiffness and joint pain I get, the nausea, and being tired all day and then not being able to sleep at night. I’m a huge fan of the heating pad, and keeping hydrated, and taking my days one day at a time.”

5. “The whole body stiffness as if you’ve worked every bone in your body the day before. No way to deal with the pain, but working out does help…. lessens some of the stiffness. I really notice it more when I don’t do cardio. I tell my family I work out to lose weight, which is true, but it’s more so to help with the stiffness.”

6. “When something always hurts, it’s hard to focus. When you never get good sleep, getting through a work day without a nap is incredibly difficult. I use essential oils to help with both. I make sure I get the best sleep that I can and rest when I can

7. “Pain in every part of my body! Some days it even hurts to breath. I pamper myself on those days and do only what is necessary. I save a book I know I will get lost in reading, have a few naps, and try to relax my tight muscles to minimize the pain. I cuddle and pet my dogs a lot, too. I live by myself in the Minnesota up-north woods far away from the noise and stress of living in a city. The quiet and solitude help keep me relaxed.”

8. “For me it’s the cognitive issues. I can hide the pain, but when I can’t form words or get lost in familiar places and see the look of pity on faces of others, I want to cry. I used to be confident and outgoing. Now I just want to hide away.”

9. “Worst symptoms for me are the random hand twitches. I deal with them by making jokes.”

10. “Not having an internal thermostat. I’m rarely just a comfortable temp. Always hot or freezing! I try to dress with layers and know where fans and fresh air are when possible!”

11. “Waking up achy like I hiked 20 miles, feeling like I didn’t sleep at all, and feeling like my head is stuck in the fog. It feels like I’m jet-lagged all the time, walking through quicksand with the body aches of the flu… I try to have a positive attitude about the good parts of my life and manage the best I can.”

12. “The inconsistency. One day you may be feeling relatively good and the next day you are unable to get out of bed. Fibro doesn’t care if you have things to do that day; if it is a bad pain day, it is a bad pain day.”

13. “The worst symptom would have to be my loss of self. I worked hard for the life I had. I was happy. But now I feel like such a burden. No matter how positive I am or how much I smile, I struggle with the constant removal of independence. I’m not sure how to love or even like what I’ve become. I do have amazing support from my partner, and I appreciate it it more than he will ever know. Time together will make a difference. So will finding new happy moments and places.”

14. “The worst symptom is a specific kind of pain; it feels as though I’m being stabbed, in random order, with a red-hot electrified knife all over my body. There’s no relief. All I can do is rub my feet/hands/legs/arms, curl up in a ball and wait for it to pass.”

15. “I have good days and bad days, but on the bad days it feels like every joint in my body is screaming. On those days I take a nice long epson salt bath with bubbles and calm music; it always helps.”

16. “Fibromyalgia flare-ups are the worst. The pain is unbearable and it is felt in every joint, every muscle, every nerve. The fatigue is overwhelming, and sleep is often kept to a minimum since the pain is so severe. Flare-ups happen because of stress, weather, overexertion, and unfortunately, sometimes there’s no reason at all.”

17. “Feeling alone. I have found a great online community, and I cherish the couple understanding friends I have.”

What are some of the worst symptoms 

http://todayhealth247.com/feed/
#fibromialgie #fibromyalgie #fibromialgia #Fibromyalgia #fibro #fibrowarrior #vie #vida #life #health #santé #salud

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17 of the Worst Symptoms of Fibromyalgia (and How People Deal With Them)

Fibromyalgia manifests itself in different ways for different patients, but most can agree that all the symptoms are life-altering. It’s not always clear how (or if) they can be treated, and the physical challenges can all too easily turn into emotional challenges as the things you used to do become more and more difficult.

We asked our Mighty community with fibromyalgia which symptoms they consider the worst and how they cope with them. If you’re experiencing these difficult symptoms as well, check out the strategies they use, and don’t forget that you aren’t alone in dealing with the hardships of fibromyalgia.

Here’s what the community told us:

1. “Never-ending fatigue. I’m still trying to figure out what helps, but so far, certain homeopathic medicines are working. My online support group helps tremendously! And there’s always Netflix. Cuddles from my cats help, too!”

2. “When I feel like I’m walking through quicksand. The only thing that helps is to take a break for a day and rest.”

3. “To me, the worst part of fibro isn’t the pain/stiffness or the constant fatigue, it’s my non-existent social life and constantly feeling alone/misunderstood. Even on the awful days, I always find some way to cope or I just lay in bed and whine to my pets. But it’s hard to find a way to ‘cope’ with the loneliness and the depression that follows it.”

4. “The worst is the joint stiffness and joint pain I get, the nausea, and being tired all day and then not being able to sleep at night. I’m a huge fan of the heating pad, and keeping hydrated, and taking my days one day at a time.”

5. “The whole body stiffness as if you’ve worked every bone in your body the day before. No way to deal with the pain, but working out does help…. lessens some of the stiffness. I really notice it more when I don’t do cardio. I tell my family I work out to lose weight, which is true, but it’s more so to help with the stiffness.”

6. “When something always hurts, it’s hard to focus. When you never get good sleep, getting through a work day without a nap is incredibly difficult. I use essential oils to help with both. I make sure I get the best sleep that I can and rest when I can

7. “Pain in every part of my body! Some days it even hurts to breath. I pamper myself on those days and do only what is necessary. I save a book I know I will get lost in reading, have a few naps, and try to relax my tight muscles to minimize the pain. I cuddle and pet my dogs a lot, too. I live by myself in the Minnesota up-north woods far away from the noise and stress of living in a city. The quiet and solitude help keep me relaxed.”

8. “For me it’s the cognitive issues. I can hide the pain, but when I can’t form words or get lost in familiar places and see the look of pity on faces of others, I want to cry. I used to be confident and outgoing. Now I just want to hide away.”

9. “Worst symptoms for me are the random hand twitches. I deal with them by making jokes.”

10. “Not having an internal thermostat. I’m rarely just a comfortable temp. Always hot or freezing! I try to dress with layers and know where fans and fresh air are when possible!”

11. “Waking up achy like I hiked 20 miles, feeling like I didn’t sleep at all, and feeling like my head is stuck in the fog. It feels like I’m jet-lagged all the time, walking through quicksand with the body aches of the flu… I try to have a positive attitude about the good parts of my life and manage the best I can.”

12. “The inconsistency. One day you may be feeling relatively good and the next day you are unable to get out of bed. Fibro doesn’t care if you have things to do that day; if it is a bad pain day, it is a bad pain day.”

13. “The worst symptom would have to be my loss of self. I worked hard for the life I had. I was happy. But now I feel like such a burden. No matter how positive I am or how much I smile, I struggle with the constant removal of independence. I’m not sure how to love or even like what I’ve become. I do have amazing support from my partner, and I appreciate it it more than he will ever know. Time together will make a difference. So will finding new happy moments and places.”

14. “The worst symptom is a specific kind of pain; it feels as though I’m being stabbed, in random order, with a red-hot electrified knife all over my body. There’s no relief. All I can do is rub my feet/hands/legs/arms, curl up in a ball and wait for it to pass.”

15. “I have good days and bad days, but on the bad days it feels like every joint in my body is screaming. On those days I take a nice long epson salt bath with bubbles and calm music; it always helps.”

16. “Fibromyalgia flare-ups are the worst. The pain is unbearable and it is felt in every joint, every muscle, every nerve. The fatigue is overwhelming, and sleep is often kept to a minimum since the pain is so severe. Flare-ups happen because of stress, weather, overexertion, and unfortunately, sometimes there’s no reason at all.”

17. “Feeling alone. I have found a great online community, and I cherish the couple understanding friends I have.”

What are some of the worst symptoms 

http://todayhealth247.com/feed/
#fibromialgie #fibromyalgie #fibromialgia #Fibromyalgia #fibro #fibrowarrior #vie #vida #life #health #santé #salud

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17 of the Worst Symptoms of Fibromyalgia (and How People Deal With Them)

Fibromyalgia manifests itself in different ways for different patients, but most can agree that all the symptoms are life-altering. It’s not always clear how (or if) they can be treated, and the physical challenges can all too easily turn into emotional challenges as the things you used to do become more and more difficult.

We asked our Mighty community with fibromyalgia which symptoms they consider the worst and how they cope with them. If you’re experiencing these difficult symptoms as well, check out the strategies they use, and don’t forget that you aren’t alone in dealing with the hardships of fibromyalgia.

Here’s what the community told us:

1. “Never-ending fatigue. I’m still trying to figure out what helps, but so far, certain homeopathic medicines are working. My online support group helps tremendously! And there’s always Netflix. Cuddles from my cats help, too!”

2. “When I feel like I’m walking through quicksand. The only thing that helps is to take a break for a day and rest.”

3. “To me, the worst part of fibro isn’t the pain/stiffness or the constant fatigue, it’s my non-existent social life and constantly feeling alone/misunderstood. Even on the awful days, I always find some way to cope or I just lay in bed and whine to my pets. But it’s hard to find a way to ‘cope’ with the loneliness and the depression that follows it.”

4. “The worst is the joint stiffness and joint pain I get, the nausea, and being tired all day and then not being able to sleep at night. I’m a huge fan of the heating pad, and keeping hydrated, and taking my days one day at a time.”

5. “The whole body stiffness as if you’ve worked every bone in your body the day before. No way to deal with the pain, but working out does help…. lessens some of the stiffness. I really notice it more when I don’t do cardio. I tell my family I work out to lose weight, which is true, but it’s more so to help with the stiffness.”

6. “When something always hurts, it’s hard to focus. When you never get good sleep, getting through a work day without a nap is incredibly difficult. I use essential oils to help with both. I make sure I get the best sleep that I can and rest when I can

7. “Pain in every part of my body! Some days it even hurts to breath. I pamper myself on those days and do only what is necessary. I save a book I know I will get lost in reading, have a few naps, and try to relax my tight muscles to minimize the pain. I cuddle and pet my dogs a lot, too. I live by myself in the Minnesota up-north woods far away from the noise and stress of living in a city. The quiet and solitude help keep me relaxed.”

8. “For me it’s the cognitive issues. I can hide the pain, but when I can’t form words or get lost in familiar places and see the look of pity on faces of others, I want to cry. I used to be confident and outgoing. Now I just want to hide away.”

9. “Worst symptoms for me are the random hand twitches. I deal with them by making jokes.”

10. “Not having an internal thermostat. I’m rarely just a comfortable temp. Always hot or freezing! I try to dress with layers and know where fans and fresh air are when possible!”

11. “Waking up achy like I hiked 20 miles, feeling like I didn’t sleep at all, and feeling like my head is stuck in the fog. It feels like I’m jet-lagged all the time, walking through quicksand with the body aches of the flu… I try to have a positive attitude about the good parts of my life and manage the best I can.”

12. “The inconsistency. One day you may be feeling relatively good and the next day you are unable to get out of bed. Fibro doesn’t care if you have things to do that day; if it is a bad pain day, it is a bad pain day.”

13. “The worst symptom would have to be my loss of self. I worked hard for the life I had. I was happy. But now I feel like such a burden. No matter how positive I am or how much I smile, I struggle with the constant removal of independence. I’m not sure how to love or even like what I’ve become. I do have amazing support from my partner, and I appreciate it it more than he will ever know. Time together will make a difference. So will finding new happy moments and places.”

14. “The worst symptom is a specific kind of pain; it feels as though I’m being stabbed, in random order, with a red-hot electrified knife all over my body. There’s no relief. All I can do is rub my feet/hands/legs/arms, curl up in a ball and wait for it to pass.”

15. “I have good days and bad days, but on the bad days it feels like every joint in my body is screaming. On those days I take a nice long epson salt bath with bubbles and calm music; it always helps.”

16. “Fibromyalgia flare-ups are the worst. The pain is unbearable and it is felt in every joint, every muscle, every nerve. The fatigue is overwhelming, and sleep is often kept to a minimum since the pain is so severe. Flare-ups happen because of stress, weather, overexertion, and unfortunately, sometimes there’s no reason at all.”

17. “Feeling alone. I have found a great online community, and I cherish the couple understanding friends I have.”

What are some of the worst symptoms 

http://todayhealth247.com/feed/
#fibromialgie #fibromyalgie #fibromialgia #Fibromyalgia #fibro #fibrowarrior #vie #vida #life #health #santé #salud

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17 of the Worst Symptoms of Fibromyalgia (and How People Deal With Them)

Fibromyalgia manifests itself in different ways for different patients, but most can agree that all the symptoms are life-altering. It’s not always clear how (or if) they can be treated, and the physical challenges can all too easily turn into emotional challenges as the things you used to do become more and more difficult.

We asked our Mighty community with fibromyalgia which symptoms they consider the worst and how they cope with them. If you’re experiencing these difficult symptoms as well, check out the strategies they use, and don’t forget that you aren’t alone in dealing with the hardships of fibromyalgia.

Here’s what the community told us:

1. “Never-ending fatigue. I’m still trying to figure out what helps, but so far, certain homeopathic medicines are working. My online support group helps tremendously! And there’s always Netflix. Cuddles from my cats help, too!”

2. “When I feel like I’m walking through quicksand. The only thing that helps is to take a break for a day and rest.”

3. “To me, the worst part of fibro isn’t the pain/stiffness or the constant fatigue, it’s my non-existent social life and constantly feeling alone/misunderstood. Even on the awful days, I always find some way to cope or I just lay in bed and whine to my pets. But it’s hard to find a way to ‘cope’ with the loneliness and the depression that follows it.”

4. “The worst is the joint stiffness and joint pain I get, the nausea, and being tired all day and then not being able to sleep at night. I’m a huge fan of the heating pad, and keeping hydrated, and taking my days one day at a time.”

5. “The whole body stiffness as if you’ve worked every bone in your body the day before. No way to deal with the pain, but working out does help…. lessens some of the stiffness. I really notice it more when I don’t do cardio. I tell my family I work out to lose weight, which is true, but it’s more so to help with the stiffness.”

6. “When something always hurts, it’s hard to focus. When you never get good sleep, getting through a work day without a nap is incredibly difficult. I use essential oils to help with both. I make sure I get the best sleep that I can and rest when I can

7. “Pain in every part of my body! Some days it even hurts to breath. I pamper myself on those days and do only what is necessary. I save a book I know I will get lost in reading, have a few naps, and try to relax my tight muscles to minimize the pain. I cuddle and pet my dogs a lot, too. I live by myself in the Minnesota up-north woods far away from the noise and stress of living in a city. The quiet and solitude help keep me relaxed.”

8. “For me it’s the cognitive issues. I can hide the pain, but when I can’t form words or get lost in familiar places and see the look of pity on faces of others, I want to cry. I used to be confident and outgoing. Now I just want to hide away.”

9. “Worst symptoms for me are the random hand twitches. I deal with them by making jokes.”

10. “Not having an internal thermostat. I’m rarely just a comfortable temp. Always hot or freezing! I try to dress with layers and know where fans and fresh air are when possible!”

11. “Waking up achy like I hiked 20 miles, feeling like I didn’t sleep at all, and feeling like my head is stuck in the fog. It feels like I’m jet-lagged all the time, walking through quicksand with the body aches of the flu… I try to have a positive attitude about the good parts of my life and manage the best I can.”

12. “The inconsistency. One day you may be feeling relatively good and the next day you are unable to get out of bed. Fibro doesn’t care if you have things to do that day; if it is a bad pain day, it is a bad pain day.”

13. “The worst symptom would have to be my loss of self. I worked hard for the life I had. I was happy. But now I feel like such a burden. No matter how positive I am or how much I smile, I struggle with the constant removal of independence. I’m not sure how to love or even like what I’ve become. I do have amazing support from my partner, and I appreciate it it more than he will ever know. Time together will make a difference. So will finding new happy moments and places.”

14. “The worst symptom is a specific kind of pain; it feels as though I’m being stabbed, in random order, with a red-hot electrified knife all over my body. There’s no relief. All I can do is rub my feet/hands/legs/arms, curl up in a ball and wait for it to pass.”

15. “I have good days and bad days, but on the bad days it feels like every joint in my body is screaming. On those days I take a nice long epson salt bath with bubbles and calm music; it always helps.”

16. “Fibromyalgia flare-ups are the worst. The pain is unbearable and it is felt in every joint, every muscle, every nerve. The fatigue is overwhelming, and sleep is often kept to a minimum since the pain is so severe. Flare-ups happen because of stress, weather, overexertion, and unfortunately, sometimes there’s no reason at all.”

17. “Feeling alone. I have found a great online community, and I cherish the couple understanding friends I have.”

What are some of the worst symptoms 

http://todayhealth247.com/feed/
#fibromialgie #fibromyalgie #fibromialgia #Fibromyalgia #fibro #fibrowarrior #vie #vida #life #health #santé #salud

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17 of the Worst Symptoms of Fibromyalgia (and How People Deal With Them)

Fibromyalgia manifests itself in different ways for different patients, but most can agree that all the symptoms are life-altering. It’s not always clear how (or if) they can be treated, and the physical challenges can all too easily turn into emotional challenges as the things you used to do become more and more difficult.

We asked our Mighty community with fibromyalgia which symptoms they consider the worst and how they cope with them. If you’re experiencing these difficult symptoms as well, check out the strategies they use, and don’t forget that you aren’t alone in dealing with the hardships of fibromyalgia.

Here’s what the community told us:

1. “Never-ending fatigue. I’m still trying to figure out what helps, but so far, certain homeopathic medicines are working. My online support group helps tremendously! And there’s always Netflix. Cuddles from my cats help, too!”

2. “When I feel like I’m walking through quicksand. The only thing that helps is to take a break for a day and rest.”

3. “To me, the worst part of fibro isn’t the pain/stiffness or the constant fatigue, it’s my non-existent social life and constantly feeling alone/misunderstood. Even on the awful days, I always find some way to cope or I just lay in bed and whine to my pets. But it’s hard to find a way to ‘cope’ with the loneliness and the depression that follows it.”

4. “The worst is the joint stiffness and joint pain I get, the nausea, and being tired all day and then not being able to sleep at night. I’m a huge fan of the heating pad, and keeping hydrated, and taking my days one day at a time.”

5. “The whole body stiffness as if you’ve worked every bone in your body the day before. No way to deal with the pain, but working out does help…. lessens some of the stiffness. I really notice it more when I don’t do cardio. I tell my family I work out to lose weight, which is true, but it’s more so to help with the stiffness.”

6. “When something always hurts, it’s hard to focus. When you never get good sleep, getting through a work day without a nap is incredibly difficult. I use essential oils to help with both. I make sure I get the best sleep that I can and rest when I can

7. “Pain in every part of my body! Some days it even hurts to breath. I pamper myself on those days and do only what is necessary. I save a book I know I will get lost in reading, have a few naps, and try to relax my tight muscles to minimize the pain. I cuddle and pet my dogs a lot, too. I live by myself in the Minnesota up-north woods far away from the noise and stress of living in a city. The quiet and solitude help keep me relaxed.”

8. “For me it’s the cognitive issues. I can hide the pain, but when I can’t form words or get lost in familiar places and see the look of pity on faces of others, I want to cry. I used to be confident and outgoing. Now I just want to hide away.”

9. “Worst symptoms for me are the random hand twitches. I deal with them by making jokes.”

10. “Not having an internal thermostat. I’m rarely just a comfortable temp. Always hot or freezing! I try to dress with layers and know where fans and fresh air are when possible!”

11. “Waking up achy like I hiked 20 miles, feeling like I didn’t sleep at all, and feeling like my head is stuck in the fog. It feels like I’m jet-lagged all the time, walking through quicksand with the body aches of the flu… I try to have a positive attitude about the good parts of my life and manage the best I can.”

12. “The inconsistency. One day you may be feeling relatively good and the next day you are unable to get out of bed. Fibro doesn’t care if you have things to do that day; if it is a bad pain day, it is a bad pain day.”

13. “The worst symptom would have to be my loss of self. I worked hard for the life I had. I was happy. But now I feel like such a burden. No matter how positive I am or how much I smile, I struggle with the constant removal of independence. I’m not sure how to love or even like what I’ve become. I do have amazing support from my partner, and I appreciate it it more than he will ever know. Time together will make a difference. So will finding new happy moments and places.”

14. “The worst symptom is a specific kind of pain; it feels as though I’m being stabbed, in random order, with a red-hot electrified knife all over my body. There’s no relief. All I can do is rub my feet/hands/legs/arms, curl up in a ball and wait for it to pass.”

15. “I have good days and bad days, but on the bad days it feels like every joint in my body is screaming. On those days I take a nice long epson salt bath with bubbles and calm music; it always helps.”

16. “Fibromyalgia flare-ups are the worst. The pain is unbearable and it is felt in every joint, every muscle, every nerve. The fatigue is overwhelming, and sleep is often kept to a minimum since the pain is so severe. Flare-ups happen because of stress, weather, overexertion, and unfortunately, sometimes there’s no reason at all.”

17. “Feeling alone. I have found a great online community, and I cherish the couple understanding friends I have.”

What are some of the worst symptoms 

http://todayhealth247.com/feed/
#fibromialgie #fibromyalgie #fibromialgia #Fibromyalgia #fibro #fibrowarrior #vie #vida #life #health #santé #salud

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